CARE Week 2017- A week to raise awareness about sexual assault, rape, and intimate partner violence

Tuesday, March 28. Though matters of rape and sexual assault are issues that college students face throughout the year, the WC holds Concerned About Rape Education (CARE) Week during the spring semester of every year which focuses on raising awareness about sexual assault and intimate partner violence on and off campus.
Also, don’t miss Take Back the Night!

Effective Recruitment Strategies for Older Workers

When it comes to workforce planning, it’s all about the numbers – of people, that is.  Demographic data suggest impending labor shortages and increasingly tight labor markets, due to projections of weak growth in the working age population over the next 15 years. Continued immigration will help to fill some of the gaps, however, an increasing number of older workers are healthy and motivated to continue working. They could fill some of these deficits in the talent pool, and might want to do so for several reasons: to supplement their current income or retirement funds, obtain health insurance benefits, pursue an encore career, or just to remain active in the world of work.
Read the complete article.

Googled: Alex Truesdell, M.Ed.’82

In 1981, Alex Truesdell‘s aunt Lynn Valley suffered a spinal injury that left her hands paralyzed. Watching (and helping) her uncle turn inexpensive, readily available materials into devices that enabled Valley to accomplish her daily activities inspired Truesdell to do the same for students at the Perkins School for the Blind in Watertown, Massachusetts, where she worked. Read the complet story.

AAIHS – African American Intellectual History Society

Over the past several weeks, I have been working closely with fellow historians Chad Williams and Kidada Williams; and a group of talented librarians (Cecily Walker, Ryan P. Randall, and Melissa Morrone) on the #Charlestonsyllabus. In the aftermath of thehorrendous shooting that unfolded in Charleston, South Carolina, Chad Williams turned to Twitter to express his frustrations about the continued distortions of history that charlestonSyllabus

dominated mass media. Indeed, these same distorted versions of history have often dominated public discourse—i.e. suggestions that somehow the Confederate flag the shooter displayed on his clothing had nothing to do with white supremacy; or somehow the shooter’s actions were so exceptional as to imply that it was not part of a long and painful history of anti-black racism and racial violence in the US and abroad.

Coping While Black: A Season Of Traumatic News Takes A Psychological Toll

Can racism cause post-traumatic stress? That’s one big question psychologists are trying to answer, particularly in the aftermath of the shooting at the historically black Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, S.C., and the recent incidents involving police where race was a factor. Read or listen to the article

Don’t assume a parent’s disability puts their children at risk

While I hope our family situation does not change, it would be a scary proposition if it did — partly because of an unfortunate loophole in Massachusetts law: I could be separated from my children based on others’ preconceived notions about my capabilities.

Did I mention I’m blind?  Read the complete article