Black and Brown Amidst the Orange and Green: Toward a Multiracial History of Ireland

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The Fall 2018 Dalsimer Lecture, titled Black and Brown Amidst the Orange and Green: Toward a Multiracial History of Ireland, will be presented by Dr. Mark Doyle from Middle Tennessee State University!

The history of nonwhite people in Ireland extends much further, and is much more significant, than many people suppose. This lecture will uncover the deep history of Asian and African immigrants and visitors to Ireland in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, arguing for a new history of Ireland that not only incorporates the experiences of nonwhite people but also uses those experiences to understand Irish attitudes toward race, immigration, and empire in the modern era.42182207_1806237572829434_5283205529546522624_o

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Hispanic Heritage Month Opening

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Hispanic Heritage Month kicks off with a special event welcoming keynote speaker Stephanie Valencia!

Celebrate culture and engage in conversation with a prominent staff member in the White House Office of Public Engagement during the Obama Administration.

Thursday, September 20th at 6pm-8pm in the Murray Room.
Interested? RSVP Here: https://goo.gl/q7TJss

M. Shawn Copeland: Distinction in Theology

The Catholic Theological Society of America Honored three Boston College theologians at its convention earlier this month, most notably Professor of Theology M. Shawn Copeland who received the prestigious John Courtney Murray Award in recognition of a lifetime of distinguished theological achievement.

Named for an influential American Jesuit theologian (and Boston College alumnus), the John Courtney Murray Award is the highest honor bestowed by the CTSA, the principal association of Catholic theologians in North America and the largest professional society of theologians in the world. Copeland is the first African American recipient of the award.

M Shawn Copeland

Read the full story.

Men, women, and food for others

BC DiningAt the end of every academic year, Boston College Dining Services provides students with an opportunity to donate some of their year-meal plan money to a charitable cause. In collaboration with the student group Every Bite Counts (eBC), volunteers from both groups staff collection tables on campus.

Read the full story at: http://www.bc.edu/bc-web/bcnews/campus-community/around-campus/bc-dining-donations.html

BC Student Veterans Group

An effort is under way to coordinate and bolster communication among graduate and undergraduate student U.S. military veterans in the Boston College community.

Leading the initiative is BC School of Social Work student Lisa Smith, a Connecticut native who served for four years in the Air Force. Smith sees an opportunity to build on the strengths of the BC Veterans Alumni Network (BCVAN) and the BC Veterans Affinity Group for faculty and staff, so that students who served – or plan to serve – in the military will have access to a broad array of resources and contacts.

Read the full article at: https://www.bc.edu/bc-web/bcnews/campus-community/around-campus/bc-student-veterans-networking.html

For more information on the Boston College Student Veteran Association, contact Lisa Smith (lisa.smith@teamrubiconusa.org), check out their Facebook page, or read their newsletters.

Lifetime Achievement Award – Deborah Washington

Connell School of Nursing alumna Deborah Washington, director of Diversity for Patient Care Services at Massachusetts General Hospital, will receive the 2017 Lifetime Achievement Award from the National Black Nurses Association, to be presented in August at the association’s annual institute and conference.

NBNA Lifetime Achievement Award honorees are selected based on their outstanding contributions to the profession of nursing and their work to promote the mission and goals of the NBNA.

Read the full article at: http://www.bc.edu/bc-web/bcnews/science-tech-and-health/nursing/award-for-deb-washington.html

Historian wins ‘best book’ prize in environmental history

The scenario is a familiar one: Floodwaters ravage communities, causing widespread death and destruction. Questions are raised about authorities’ land management and responses to the disaster. Consequences, for the land and its people, are far-reaching and in some cases permanent.

Hurricane Katrina, the great Mississippi flood of 1927 and similar events in modern history – including the recent crisis at the Oroville Dam in California – often serve as case studies for the complex relationship between man and environment. But Associate Professor of History Ling Zhang finds equally compelling lessons from a disaster in medieval China, and her book on the subject has been recognized by the premier organization in the emerging, interdisciplinary field of environmental history.